Advanced Precision Machining

Advanced Precision Machining provides unparalleled customer satisfaction. Call us today at 303.776.1910.

Plating

 

Advanced Precision Machining is a state-of-the-art Longmont machine shop and features fully certified machinists. Our machine shop offers full-service plating, turning, milling, grinding, prototype development and production solutions. Featuring the latest CNC Mills and CNC Lathes, we cut steels, composite materials, exotic metals, aluminum, and plastics.

Since opening in 2005, Advanced Precision Machining has tripled in size and we continue to grow. Contact our machine shop in Longmont today for a free quote or consultation. We will be happy to discuss any plating, turning, milling, grinding, prototype development and production project with you. 

For additional information about grinding, please refer to the below information or feel free to contact one of our fully certified machining experts.

 

Electroplating is a plating process in which metal ions in a solution are moved by an electric field to coat an electrode. The process usesPlating, Grinding, CNC Milling, CNC Turning - Longmont Machine Shop electrical current to reduce cations of a desired material from a solution and coat a conductive object with a thin layer of the material, such as a metal. Electroplating is primarily used for depositing a layer of material to bestow a desired property (e.g., abrasion and wear resistance, corrosion protection, lubricity, aesthetic qualities, etc.) to a surface that otherwise lacks that property. Another application uses electroplating to build up thickness on undersized parts.

The process used in electroplating is called electrodeposition. It is analogous to a galvanic cell acting in reverse. The part to be plated is the cathode of the circuit. Both components are immersed in a solution called an electrolyte containing one or more dissolved metal salts as well as other ions that permit the flow of electricity. A power supply supplies a direct current to the anode, oxidizing the metal atoms that comprise it and allowing them to dissolve in the solution. At the cathode, the dissolved metal ions in the electrolyte solution are reduced at the interface between the solution and the cathode, such that they "plate out" onto the cathode. The rate at which the anode is dissolved is equal to the rate at which the cathode is plated. In this manner, the ions in the electrolyte bath are continuously replenished by the anode.

Other electroplating processes may use a non-consumable anode such as lead. In these techniques, ions of the metal to be plated must be periodically replenished in the bath as they are drawn out of the solution.

Plating: Hull Cell
The Hull cell is a type of test cell used to qualitatively check the condition of an electroplating bath. It allows for optimization for current density range, optimization of additive concentration, recognition of impurity effects and indication of macro-throwing power capability. The Hull cell replicates the plating bath on a lab scale. It is filled with a sample of the plating solution, an appropriate anode which is connected to a rectifier. The "work" is replaced with a hull cell test panel that will be plated to show the "health" of the bath.

The Hull cell is a trapezoidal container that holds 267 ml of solution. This shape allows one to place the test panel on an angle to the anode. As a result, the deposit is plated at different current densities which can be measured with a hull cell ruler. The solution volume allows for a quantitative optimization of additive concentration: 1 gram addition to 267 mL is equivalent to 0.5 oz/gal in the plating tank.

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